Prospective Undergraduates

Majors

Landscape Architecture Major

This is a nationally accredited, professional degree program.

Students earn a BSLA degree.

Ecology, people, place and community are just a few of the words landscape architects use everyday as they strive to solve the complex problems of planning vibrant communities and designing places of value while protecting and restoring our natural resources.

150 years ago Connecticut’s own Frederick Law Olmsted called for the conservation of the Yosemite Valley, designed Central Park, solved the flooding of Boston’s Back Bay Fens, planned campuses across the United States and introduced the world to landscape architecture.

Today landscape architects are creating the High Line Trail, restoring landscape systems in the Lower Don Lands of Toronto, designing the 9/11 Memorial, planning Olympic villages and remaking campuses and communities around the world.

Click here to visit the American Society of Landscape Architects' design page.

If you are interested in protecting nature; if you love to see happy people; if you think about how to make better cities; if you like to build things; if there are outside places that have touched your soul; if you want to make a better world you should come join us.

Click here to view UConn L.A. Public Policy Information.

Major requirements

All of:
BIOL 1108: Principles of Biology (or 1110: Intro. to Botany)
CHEM 1122: Chemical Principles & Applications (or 1124Q or 1127Q)
SPSS 3410: Woody Plants: Common Trees, Shrubs, & Vines
SPSS 2120: Environmental Soil Science
LAND 2110: Graphics I - Design Drawing
LAND 2120: Graphics II - Design Communication
LAND 2210: The Common (Shared) Landscape of the USA
LAND 2220: Theory II - Design History
LAND 2410: Design I - Site Analysis
LAND 3130- Graphics III - Computer Applications
LAND 3230W: Environmental Planning & Landscape Design
LAND 3310: Construction I - Site Engineering
LAND 3320: Construction II - Materials and Methods
LAND 3330: Construction III - Planting Design
LAND 3420: Design II - Space, Form and Meaning
LAND 3430: Design III - Program Development
LAND 4294: Theory V - Seminar
LAND 4340: Theory IV - Professional Practice
LAND 4440: Design IV - Community Planning
LAND 4450: Design V - Capstone
One of:
One approved 2000 level or higher course outside the Department of Plant Science & L.A.
One of:
SPSS 2430: Herbaceous Ornamental Plants
SPSS 4210: Plant Physiology: How Plants Work
EEB 4272: The Summer Flora
NRE 2415: Dendrology

 

**For more detailed information, refer to the Landscape Architecture plan of study form**

Sustainable Plant and Soil Systems

The Sustainable Plant and Soil Systems major, with concentrations in Environmental Horticulture, Sustainable Agriculture, and Turfgrass Science, focuses on the science and practices associated with sustainable plant production and/or use within managed systems. Courses emphasize practices and concepts related to reducing environmental impact during production and in managed land use systems.

Click here to view all of the Sustainable Plant and Soil Systems (SPSS) course offerings.

Concentrations focus on the production of ornamental and edible crops in controlled environments, greenhouses, nurseries and on farms; management practices for built landscapes and surfaces used for recreational and sporting activities, and the selection and management of ornamental trees, shrubs, grasses, native species, and plants and soils that perform ecosystem services in recreational, urban, and suburban settings to meet functional and aesthetic requirements. The program emphasizes hands-on learning, and developing and applying knowledge to solve contemporary problems in individual and team approaches. Students have the opportunity to gain real-world experience through internships
THESE REQUIREMENTS ARE FOR THE CURRENT CATALOG YEAR

(Click here to view past catalogs)

The writing in the major requirement is satisfied by SPSS 2560W or SPSS 2110W.

All students in this major must complete the following courses:

All of:
BIOL 1108: Principles of Biology (or 1110: Introduction to Botany)
CHEM 1122: Chemical Principles and Applications (or 1124Q or 1127Q)
SPSS 1120: Introduction to Plant Science
SPSS 2110W: Sustainable Plant Pest Management Communication or SPSS 2560W: Written Communications in Horticulture
SPSS 2120: Environmental Soil Science
SPSS 2125: Soils Lab
SPSS 4210: Plant Physiology: How Plants Work

Environmental Horticulture Concentration

All of:

SPSS 3640: Plant Propagation

Two of:

SPSS 2430: Herbaceous Ornamental Plants
SPSS 3410: Woody Plants: Common Trees, Shrubs and Vines
SPSS 3560: Interior Plants and Interioriscaping

Two of:

SPSS 3810: Fundamentals of Plant Pathology
SPSS 3820: Ecology and Control of Weeds
SPSS 3830: Horticultural Entomology

Three of:

SPSS 3540: Garden Center Management
SPSS 3550: Urban Plant Systems Construction & Maintenance
SPSS 3610: Organic and Sustainable Vegetable Production
SPSS 3660: Nursery Production
SPSS 3670: Greenhouse Technology and Operations
SPSS 4650: Plant Tissue Culture

Sustainable Agriculture Concentration

All of:
SPSS 2100: Environmental Sustainability of Food Production in Developed Countries
SPSS 2500: Principles and Concepts of Agroecology
SPSS 3610: Organic and Sustainable Vegetable Production
SPSS 3620: Soil Fertility
SPSS 3840: Integrated Pest Management
SPSS 3990: Field Study Internship
Two of:
SPSS 3810: Fundamentals of Plant Pathology
SPSS 3820: Ecology and Control of Weeds
SPSS 3830: Horticultural Entomology

Turfgrass Science Concentration

All of:
SPSS 1100: Introduction toTurfgrass Management
SPSS 3150: Advanced Turfgrass Management
SPSS 3620: Soil Fertility
SPSS 3990: Field Study Internship
 Three of: 
SPSS 3800: Turf Pests and Control
SPSS 3810: Fundamentals of Plant Pathology
SPSS 3820: Ecology and Control of Weeds
SPSS 3830: Horticultural Entomology
 One of:
SPSS 2430: Herbaceous Ornamental Plants
SPSS 3410: Woody Plants: Common Trees, Shrubs and Vines
SPSS 3550: Urban Plant Systems Construction and Maintenance

RATCLIFFE HICKS (2 year Associates degree)

Ornamental Horticulture Concentration

University of Connecticut: Ratcliffe Hicks School of Agriculture
Major: Ornamental Horticulture and Turfgrass Management
Concentration: Ornamental Horticulture

Recommended Course Sequence

In order to complete 64 credits in four semesters, students need to average 16 credits per semester. AAS degree requirements include both required courses and additional courses, based on individual interests and goals. Scheduling problems may occur if required courses (shown below in bold italics) are not taken in the semester indicated below. Some flexibility in course selection is allowed for the general ed. and elective courses. Students should meet with their advisor regularly to discuss appropriate registration, academic status, and career goals.

**Required courses are in bold italics**

First Semester Credits
SAAG 250  Freshmen Seminar 1
Math or Writing Course MATH 1011Q, 1020Q or 1030Q or ENGL 10041 3-4
SAPL 110 Turfgrass Management 3
SAPL 120 Intro to Plant Science 4
SAPL 300 Intro to Soil Science 3
Second Semester
Social Science Course      SARE 450 (recommended) or other pre-approved course 3
Math or Writing Course MATH 1011Q, 1020Q or 1030Q or ENGL 10041  3-4
SAPL 640 Plant Propagation 3
SAPL 750 Landscape Plant Maintenance 3
Electives:
SAPL 430 Herbaceous Ornamental Plants 3
SAPL 520 Floral Art 2
SAPL 560  Indoor Plants and Interiorscaping3 3
SAPL 660 Nursery Production 3
Third Semester
Arts & Humanities Course    Pre-approved courses are on AAS Plan of Study 3
SAPL 410 Woody Plants I: Common Trees, Shrubs and Vines2 3
SAPL 810 Plant Pest Control 3
Electives:
SAAG 316 Introduction of Agricultural Mechanics and Safety 2
SAPL 620 Vegetable Production 4
SAPL 670 Greenhouse Operations2 4
SAPL 740 Landscape Construction 3
SAPL 991 Internship (Field Study previous summer) 3
SARE 460 Fund. of Accounting and Mgmt. for the Agribusiness Firm 3
Fourth Semester
Civic & Community Engagement Pre-approved courses are on AAS Plan of Study 3
SAPL 840 Integrated Pest Management2 3
Electives:
SAPL 530 Advanced Floral Design2 2
SAPL 540 Garden Center Management 3
SAPL 560 Indoor Plants and Interiorscaping3 3
1Substitutions may be considered based on SAT scores or placement exams.
2Course has prerequisite.
3Course is offered in alternate years.
This form can be found at: http://www.cag.uconn.edu/academics/RHSAHome/RHSAView.php
Last modified by the Academic Programs Office in May 2014.
Complete the AAS Plan of Study to verify requirements and for graduation.

Turfgrass Management Concentration

University of Connecticut: Ratcliffe Hicks School of Agriculture
Major: Ornamental Horticulture and Turfgrass Management
Concentration: Turfgrass Management

Recommended Course Sequence

In order to complete 64 credits in four semesters, students need to average 16 credits per semester. AAS degree requirements include both required courses and additional courses, based on individual interests and goals. Scheduling problems may occur if required courses (shown below in bold italics) are not taken in the semester indicated below. Some flexibility in course selection is allowed for the general ed. and elective courses. Students should meet with their advisor regularly to discuss appropriate registration, academic status, and career goals.

**Required courses are in bold italics**

First Semester Credits
SAAG 250  Freshmen Seminar 1
Math or Writing Course MATH 1011Q, 1020Q or 1030Q or ENGL 10041 3-4
SAPL 110 Turfgrass Management 3
SAPL 120 Intro to Plant Science 4
SAPL 300 Intro to Soil Science 3
Second Semester
Social Science Course   SARE 450 (recommended) or other pre-approved 3 course on AAS Plan of Study 3
Math or Writing Course MATH 1011Q, 1020Q or 1030Q or ENGL 10041 3-4
SAPL 750 Landscape Plant Maintenance 3
SAPL 210 Golf Course Management 3
SAPL 230 Principles of Turf Irrigation Systems 3
Third Semester
Arts & Humanities Course   Pre-approved courses are on AAS Plan of Study 3
SAPL 800 Turf Pests and Control 3
SAPL 991 Internship3 3
Electives:
SAAG 316 Intro to Agricultural Mechanics4 2
SAPL 240 Professional Development Turfgrass Industries 2
SAPL 410 Woody Plants I: Common Trees, Shrubs, Vines2 3
SAPL 740 Landscape Construction 3
SARE 460 Fund. of Accounting and Mgmt. for the Agribusiness Firm 3
Fourth Semester
Civic & Community Engagement  Pre-approved courses are on AAS Plan of Study  3
SAPL 840 Integrated Pest Management2 3
Electives:
SAPL 352 Urban and Sports Turf Soils 3
SAPL 430 Herbaceous Ornamentals 3
SAPL 540 Garden Center Management 3
SAPL 640 Plant Propagation 3
1Substitutions may be considered based on SAT scores or placement exams.
2Course has prerequisite.
3Internship begins in summer. Report is due fall semester.
4Availability may vary.
This form can be found at: http://www.cag.uconn.edu/academics/RHSAHome/RHSAView.php
Last modified by the Academic Programs Office in May 2014.
Complete the AAS Plan of Study to verify requirements and for graduation.

Minors

Ornamental Horticulture

The minor in Ornamental Horticulture provides an introduction to the production, maintenance and use of plants to enhance human environments. Not open to students declaring the Environmental Horticulture concentration in the Sustainable Plant and Soil Systems major.

All students are required to complete a minimum 15 credits including SPSS 3640 and:
• 6 credits from among: SPSS 2430, SPSS 3410, SPSS 3560
• 3 credits from among: SPSS 2520, SPSS 3530, SPSS 3550, SPSS 3660, SPSS 3670
• 3 credits from among: SPSS 3810, SPSS 3820, SPSS 3830, SPSS 3840

At least 12 credits must not duplicate courses used to satisfy the 36 credit requirement for the student’s major, or for another minor in the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources. Students must earn a combined grade point average of 2.5 or higher for all courses listed above.

Minor Advisor:

Jessica Lubell

jessica.lubell@uconn.edu

Integrated Pest Management (IPM)

The minor provides an introduction to fundamentals of plant health and integrated pest management in agronomy, horticulture and turfgrass systems. Not open to students in the Sustainable Plant and Soil Systems major.

All students are required to complete SPSS 3840 and:
• Three of the following: SPSS 3800, SPSS 3810, SPSS 3820, SPSS 3830.

Students must earn a combined grade point average of 2.5 or higher for all courses listed above.

Minor Advisor:

Ana Legrand

ana.legrand@uconn.edu

Turfgrass Management

The minor in Turfgrass Management provides an introduction to the management and maintenance of turfgrasses used for aesthetics (residential and commercial lawns, parks, institutional grounds), recreation (golf courses, athletic and sports fields), and functional purposes (sod farms, highway medians, inland and coastal erosion control sites, conservation). This minor will also assist those interested in sales, marketing, or any other business aspects of industries associated with turfgrass and ornamental horticulture. Not open to students declaring the Turfgrass Science concentration in the Sustainable Plant and Soil Systems major.

All students are required to complete a minimum of 15 credits including:
• SPSS 1100, SPSS 2120, SPSS 3150, SPSS 3800.
• One of the following: SPSS 3100, SPSS 3300, SPSS 3620, SPSS 3810, SPSS 3820.

At least 12 credits must not duplicate courses used to satisfy the 36 credit requirement for the student’s major, or for another minor in the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources. Students must earn a combined grade point average of 2.5 or higher for all courses listed above.

Minor Advisor:

Karl Guillard

karl.guillard@uconn.edu

Agricultural Biotechnology

This interdepartmental minor provides students with an in-depth, multidisciplinary education in the field of biotechnology. The minor will prepare students for careers and advanced studies in agricultural biotechnology and applied molecular biology.

Minor Advisor:

Gerald Berkowitz

gerald.berkowitz@uconn.edu

Sustainable Food Crop Production

This minor provides an overview of issues related to sustainable food crop production within the context of environmental stewardship. Not open to students declaring the Sustainable Agriculture concentration in the Sustainable Plant and Soil Systems major.

Students must complete a minimum of 15 credits including:
• SPSS 2100, SPSS 2500 and SPSS 2620 and
• two of: SPSS 1150, SPSS 3550, SPSS 3620, SPSS 3810, SPSS 3820, SPSS 3830, SPSS 3840, SPSS 3990.

To include 3990 Field Internship, the learning contract and plan of work must be approved by the Minor Advisor. Students must earn a combined grade point average of 2.5 or higher for all courses listed above.

Minor Advisor:

Gerald Berkowitz

gerald.berkowitz@uconn.edu

Sustainable Community Food Systems

Sustainable Community Food Systems Minor – OLD Page

Sustainable Community Food Systems (SCFS) is a minor in Environmental Studies, an interdisciplinary program within the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources and the College of Liberal Arts & Science.

SCFS, is an innovative, immersive academic program with an emphasis on the intersections of food sustainability, environmentalism, and social justice.

 WHAT WILL YOU EXPERIENCE?

Sustainable Community Food Systems offers you a unique opportunity to connect theory and practice through classroom-based work with service learning and hands-on experiences in the local community. Focusing specifically on the issues of food sustainability, environmentalism, and social justice, you will gain vital skills that will enable you to become a leader in society's slow and contentious, but ongoing, shift to a more equitable, just and sustainable future.
At the heart of the Sustainable Community Food Systems minor is an intensive internship (16-20 hours per week) with a single community partner that is part of the food system. Over the course of the summer and fall, you will gain practical experience through over 450 hours of paid and credit-bearing internship.This experience is then critically analyzed through an intersectional lens on the complexities of the entire food system that will become a part of your written portfolio. This portfolio, plus your internship hours, will reflect the summation of your work.

 WHAT DO YOU GAIN?

Sustainable Community Food Systems minor will give you skills to help solve humanity's most pressing problems. This minor will allow you to learn how to be system thinkers looking at the big picture solutions of how transforming the food system is a platform for creating an equitable, humane and sustainable society.

You will discover how your actions can enable you to advocate for a more resilient and just food future. For example, you may choose to advocate for food security in just and culturally appropriate ways and/or learn how to innovate as a social entrepreneur towards a more sustainable food system.

  • “Just as no student should leave here, degree in hand, without knowing something about literature and international relations and the natural world, no student should leave without a deep sense of responsibility for the protection of the planet. It is part of being a good citizen.”— President Susan Herbst, 2012

Requirements

The minor in Sustainable Community Food Systems requires the following courses:

  1. One elective from SOCI 2705, ARE 3260, ARE 4438, NRE 3265, or NUSC 3230 (3 credits)
  2. Capstone Sem./Thesis (e.g. GEOG 4000W)                        (3 credits)
  3. Commun. Food Syst. Sem. (e.g. GEOG 4095) (3 credits, SL)
  4. Internship in approved department (6 credits, SL)
  5. One food production elective from SPSS 2100, 2500, 3610 (3 credits)

*Completion of a minor requires that a student earn a C (2.0) grade or better in each of the required courses for that minor.

SCFS_Minor Plan of Study

Sustainable Community Food Systems Minor Internship Application

Contact info

  • Dr. Phoebe Godfrey: Phoebe.godfrey@uconn.edu
  • Dr. Andy Ballantine <andy.ballantine@uconn.edu

 

Testimonials

  • "For me, learning is the process of incorporating something new into my self… it demands that I am intimately involved with what I'm learning and SCFS will give me that opportunity. As a current Spring Valley farmer, I can say that almost all of my true learning happens here at the farm." - Jessica L.W.
  • “By digging in, and getting involved, I developed not only new skills, but also connections to my fellow student farmers that offered new perspectives on local food systems and sustainability. We all learned from each other, not just from a lecture. If you’re interested in collaborative and hands on learning then SCFS is definitely the place for you.” - Alana D.

     

    •  Sustainable Community Food Systems offers students who are motivated  to get out of the ‘classroom box’ an innovative opportunity to learn creative critical thinking skills, as well as hands-on engagement with our local food system. Such an opportunity will give students a leg-up in terms of working in the emerging and ever-growing food and sustainability movements – Phoebe Godfrey

     

    • “Few issues illustrate the merging of sustainability, practical human needs, local action, and equity in the way food does. In this program, you will learn all aspects of sustainability, social, economic, and environmental, through hands-on experience and self-directed study. From food production to social action to sustainable technology, you will make a difference in the local community and develop social entrepreneurship skills that you can carry to any endeavor in your future career.” – Andy Jolly-Ballantine

     

    Career Opportunities

    Farming Programs

    • Farm & Food Jobs ; Job postings that connect people, farms and food.
    • NOFA MASS ; Farming jobs in Massachusetts
    • WWOOF ; a worldwide movement linking volunteers with organic farmers and growers to promote cultural and educational experiences based on trust and non-monetary exchange, thereby helping to build a sustainable, global community.
    • Young Farmers Coalition ; Envision a country where young people who are willing to work, get trained and take a little risk, can support themselves and their families in farming.

    Federal Services

    • AmeriCorps Vista ; Volunteers in Service to America build stronger communities and help eradicate poverty through their programs
      • ResiliencyCorps ; ( A sub of AmeriCorps) Increase the resiliency of communities for individuals and for the community as a whole
    • FoodCorps ; Connects to kids to healthy school in food through service learning, so they can lead healthier lives.
    • PeaceCorps ; Provides service opportunities to immerse oneself in a community abroad, working side by side with local leaders to tackle the most pressing challenges of our generation.

    Organizations

    • Civil Eats - A daily news source for critical thought about the American food system.
    • Detroiters for Environmental Justice - Mission is local and national collaboration to advance environmental justice and sustainable redevelopment. They’re also a part of the Detroit Youth Climate Summit and have several local campaigns.
    • Environmental Law & Policy Center ; Public advocacy & environmental progress
    • Food & Water Watch ; Working closely with grassroots allies and national partners, we work to protect our food and water by standing up to corporations that put profits over people.
    • GrowWindham ; Community garden program whose focus is on growing youth, growing food, growing community. Provides internships, volunteering & jobs
    • Jobs with Justice ; Unions rights organization
    • REAL School Gardens ; Programs empower teachers, in low income communities, to lead engaging experiential lessons outdoors. REAL-world hands-on lessons accelerate learning and help students build a strong foundation for long-term academic success.
    • The Nature Conservancy ; Impact conservation in 72 countries and in all 50 states, with priorities in challenges facing lands, waters, oceans, cities and climate.

    Job Posting Sites & Other Resources

     

    Want to learn more?

    • Civil Eats - A daily news source for critical thought about the American food system.
    • Grace Links ; Highlights the connections among food, water and energy, promoting a sustainable future. Educational articles.
    • Mother Jones ; A daily news source
    • Join a local food-coop!
    • Support local food system and sustainability endeavors!
      • CLiCK Willimantic ; MIssion is to grow the vitality of our economy and community by offering shared use commercial kitchens to farmers and culinary entrepreneurs seeking to create food-based businesses; and to improve the health of our local community by teaching gardening, culinary arts, nutrition, and other food-related classes.
      • GrowWindham ; Community garden program whose focus is on growing youth, growing food, and growing community. Provides internships, volunteering & jobs

    This site will have information about our undergraduate programs.

    Contact information for faculty that can be contacted should  be listed here, with links to other pages.